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July 24, 2019
Play Hard, Play Safe

As adults, nothing draws us back to our childhood more than spending time on a playground, a swimming pool or ball fields. We are reminded of the 12’ metal slide and the ladder leading to the launch position, or the massive concrete hole filled with water, boasting two diving boards; a 3’ low dive and a 12’ high dive and a filtration system providing suspect water quality. Most memorable in my mind are the different athletic fields/courts containing miles of chain-link fencing, uneven playing surfaces, and lack of lighting. In my youth, each was constructed and operated predominantly by municipalities or school districts with some private enterprise.

Recreational societal evolution has changed. Municipalities and school districts remain primary operators, but over time there has been an insurgence of private enterprise adding these amenities to their properties and marketing efforts. With the increase in these facilities has come a spotlight that shines directly on the owner to ensure—whatever the facility is—be managed to control the overwhelming exposure that this equipment creates. To borrow General Motors marketing slogan; “This is not your Father’s Buick”.

The objective of this series is to raise awareness of exposures associated with recreational equipment and some best practices that can be implemented to mitigate the exposure, increase safety, and reduce litigation. This week, we take a look at pool safety and how we can minimize risks and avoid injury. Please note, this article is not intended to be a catch all of all dangers, exposures, and controls.

Aquatic Activities

Swimming pools and aquatic centers are beacons of fun, with children and adults alike logging plenty of splash time during hot summer and cold winter months. Outdoor municipal pools have given way to aquatic centers – both indoor and outdoor, splash parks, and HOA operated swimming pools. At one time, operators only had to concern themselves with the possible risks of diving boards and slides. Now, that risk has expanded with new equipment features such as tubes, open spiral slides, and zip lines, climbing structures, and even heightened water quality.

In many respects, pools are safer today then of years past. Awareness has been substantially heightened and the Model Aquatic Health Code (MAHC) has been established. Guidelines have been developed and implemented. Having noted this, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) reports that from 2005–2014, there were on average 3,536 drowning deaths per year. And the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) reports 4,900 people received emergency care for injuries suffered in a swimming pool or spa in each of 2011, 2012, and 2013.

It is worth noting that no pool or spa should be operated that is not in compliance with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act, also referred to P&SS Act. The P&SS was enacted by Congress and became law effective December 19, 2008. A PDF of the act can be found here. This law is designed to prevent the tragic and hidden hazards of drain entrapment and eviscerations in pools and spas.

Pool equipment exposures can be managed following a few key best practice methods:

  • Develop an inspection schedule of the facility noting surface irregularities, damaged attractions, and appropriate lighting. Attractions taken out of service, as needed to correct deficiencies.
  • Establish water quality testing protocol for both pools and spas that requires water to be tested every four hours, and hourly for heavier use. Chlorine levels should be maintained between 1-3 parts per million and pH levels kept between 7.2-7.8. Record and store all test results.
  • Establish a policy and procedure to respond to fecal and vomit incidents. Document and store testing data and response efforts.
  • Post rules and regulations at the pool entrance with appropriate phone number to report deficiencies. Pools with different attractions should have rules posted pursuant to specific equipment. An Age limit requirement must be established to enter facility without adult supervision.
  •  Swimming pools with no Life Guard supervision should have signage indicating so, and age limits established requiring adult supervision.
  • Swimming pools with Life Guard supervision should have certification process in place and credentialing done by the American Red Cross or other reputable organizations. A Policy should be in place and enforced that prohibits Life Guards from having personal cell phones or any other personal communication device or music player on their person while in the chair supervising swimmers.
  • Water depth markings should be prominently displayed on the pool deck and no diving enforced.
  • A life ring and shepherd hook should be available and located in close proximity to the pool or spa.
  • An Emergency Action Plan in place and practiced to respond to inclement weather or a water borne lifesaving event.

Swimming pools, aquatic centers, and splash parks can be great fun for all ages; safely enjoyed with adult supervision. In this extremely litigious culture we find ourselves, just remember, “This is not your Father’s Buick”. Play Hard, play safe!

In our next issue, we’ll look at the safety and liabilities of playgrounds, skate parks, and athletic fields.




July 19, 2019

Not Just a Game: KC Sports Reduce Crime & Drive Economic Growth

On Thursday, June 27th CBIZ hosted its third quarter Executive Advantage Series, The Business of Sports: Innovations for Future Generations. The event took place in the historical 18th & Vine District at the Kansas City Urban Youth Academy.

The Academy project was announced in the summer of 2013 and opened its doors to local youths in 2017. The Academy promotes training, education, and character development through the practice of baseball and softball. Interestingly, Kansas City, Missouri leaders were eager to support the Academy for a reason that surprised the project’s manager, Kansas City Royals Senior Director of Baseball Operations, Kyle Vena.

“I did not envision reducing crime or the economic impact behind this,” Vena explained at the Q3 EAS event, “but what the City got behind immediately was having activity going on in the summer during the evening. When there is a city event going on, giving kids places to be productive and to enjoy themselves, crime drops 21%.”

This, according to Vena, was why the city invested so heavily in the Urban Youth Academy, and why the Academy is a Kansas City Parks & Recreation facility.

Kathy Nelson, President and CEO of the Kansas City Sports Commission, spoke to the EAS audience about other ways that sports have been good to our city. Nelson successfully led the initiative to make Kansas City a host of the NFL Draft, which will be coming to our city in 2023. Next, she has set her sights on the World Cup for 2026.

“If we were to host matches,” Nelson told the crowd, “it could be the equivalent of $620M coming into the city, comparable to six Super Bowls in one month. It will change Kansas City.”

Jake Reid, CEO of Sporting KC, spoke about homegrown soccer. “In the academy system if you come up through the academy you don’t have to do a draft. You just get signed. The entire youth soccer program is based out of Swope Soccer Village. At some point in the next 5-7 years we would love six to eight players who are homegrown.”

Tyler Epp, VP of Business Development for the Kansas City Chiefs, was persuaded to talk just briefly about record-breaking quarterback Patrick Mahomes, who recently decided to buy a house and settle down in Kansas City permanently. “Before he bought the house I was with him and he said that he hoped the community would appreciate the fact that he loves living here. He said, ‘I love living here, I want to live here, this is my kind of place.’”

The ways in which Kansas City sports are improving the city are too many to cover in a single evening’s presentation. However, other topics covered were sports camps that foster STEM learning, sports betting, the evolution of sports technology, and major league sports’ continued effort to expand internationally.

Don't miss out on the next Executive Advantage Series event on October 10, 2019. More details to come for the topic, when, and where. Please email kcevents@CBIZ.com for any additional questions.




June 20, 2019

Summer is off to a great start. The entrepreneurs that came in both have roots in Kansas City and encouraged safety and support to our local communities. More information on these companies can be found below:

City Year

City Year is a national company that has been serving communities for over 31 years. They formed the local Kansas City branch a little over four years ago. The program provides extra support to struggling students and teachers. Mentors, ranging from ages 18 – 25, assist teachers with tutoring, attendance, behavior, and more to help supplement their existing academic plan. . In 2020, City Year plans on expanding to seven schools and adding 44 americorp members. Find out more about City Year here.

Zohr

Tires are not at the top of mind for everyone. Checking to see if they need to be replaced or if they are safe to drive on once you have popped one can be time consuming. Zohr makes tire changes easy. They bring their tire changing vans to you, wherever you are. When Zohr visited our KC office, they created a live demonstration to teach our employees tire safety and just how easy their services are to use. Find out more about Zohr here.

Read about our other Entrepreneurial Showcases in our local office blogs. If you are an entrepreneur interested in sharing your story during one of our lunch-n-learns, please email Kaylee Christenson at kcevents@cbiz.com.




May 7, 2019

A Road Map for Innovation: 3 Elements of Design Thinking

In the second quarter CBIZ Executive Advantage Series, Jon Cook, Global CEO of VMLY&R, shared a key element to the advertising agency’s record of success and innovation, design thinking. The concept of design thinking transcends the advertising world and has broader applications wherever there are people delivering products, services, and experiences. Jon distilled the complex philosophy down to a method that is both repeatable and unrestricting.

Jon distilled design thinking down to three basic elements: perspective, exploration and solution.

1. Perspective

There is no single correct perspective, but beware of limiting your focus to a single overriding principle. Jon used the example of efficiency, which can lead to a culture of “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” This kind of environment stifles innovation and is unlikely to produce products or experiences that exceed expectations.

2. Exploration

Exploration could also be called the research phase. Jon warns against getting caught up in competitor research, although it can be a necessary evil at times. Focusing on competitors limits your research to your own industry, full of people answering the same questions as you with the same basic tools and strategies. Instead, try looking to thought leaders, successful campaigns across all industries, and universal everyday experiences.

3. Solution

When design thinking is used successfully, the solution will do more than answer the immediate question. The solution will change the question. For example, design thinking led VMLY&R to stop asking how to influence their audience to engage with their ads and start asking if ads were the best way to reach their audience. This simple shift led to the social phenomenon that engaged Wendy’s core audience of 18-24 year old men by live streaming a Wendy’s character playing their favorite video game. Click here to learn more about Wendy’s Story.

Jon also cautioned that there is no step-by-step approach to design thinking. The path from perspective to solution is not a linear one, but circular and continuous. By focusing on reframing the question, we can begin to reshape how innovative solutions can effectively address the needs of consumers.

To register for the next CBIZ Executive Advantage Series event, please email kcevents@CBIZ.com.




May 6, 2019

This month’s showcase feature entrepreneurs that are all about making our lives easier with technology. The entrepreneurs that came in both offered resources through their software platforms to make back office tasks a thing of the past. More information on these companies can be found below:

Risk Genius

Risk Genius is a software platform that automatically reviews insurance policies. The problem most business owners face is that they have no idea what is in their policies or what to do during an emergency. This technology is working with AI to better find the policy clauses needed within the uploaded policy database system. Another cool feature of their software of the ability to go through policies with a side by side comparison and checklist of compliance requirements. Find out more about Risk Genius here.

Site 1001

Site 1001 is a software platform for building managers and owners to have a single source of data for  optimal building and operations performance. Many buildings have one system or process that handles work orders, heating, cooling, preventative maintenance, etc.. The Site 1001 software works with Carl, your virtual assistant, to determine building specs, increase the heat, and alert the user of any dated maintenance needs to keep the building in tip top shape for the tenants. In addition, Site 1001 works directly with the general contractor, owner, property manager, and third party services to house the information all in one place. Find out more about Site 1001 here.

Read about our other Entrepreneurial Showcases in our local office blogs. If you are an entrepreneur interested in sharing your story during one of our lunch-n-learns, please email Kaylee Christenson at kcevents@cbiz.com.




April 4, 2019

This month the entrepreneurial showcases featured services that offer just what businesses need to be successful. One of the entrepreneurs that came in was Bic Media. They offered insight into different media outlets that start-ups should be taking advantage of to gain new business and interact with followers. Another entrepreneur that came in was On Point. They offered opportunities to help manage backend business. More information on these companies can be found below:

Bic Media

Bic Media is a small marketing agency in the Crossroads that specializes in video production. They want their customers to see that making videos is easy. Bic Media offers customers a wide array of formats such as animation, 3-D, and virtual reality that can be paired with original music. Their videos can be displayed by streaming via television or social media. They help take an idea and create it into reality with video. Bic Media is there for every part of the experience from the initial idea to the final product. Find out more about Bic Media here.

On Point

On Point is an outsourced back office business. They are the modern back office and look at more than just typical back office tasks. On Point are the experts in outsourced operations. On point is for businesses needing to mitigate liability and have a cost effective solution to their back office. They help organize the daily stresses burdening employers and are proactive to help continue to mitigate those stresses. Find out more about On Point here.

Read about our other Entrepreneurial Showcases in our local office blogs. If you are an entrepreneur interested in sharing your story during one of our lunch-n-learns, please email Kaylee Christenson at kcevents@cbiz.com.




March 6, 2019

This month’s showcase has been tasty and techy. City Barrel Brewing came to visit the CBIZ office this month and brought along a tasty treat for the audience. RPI Creative also visited CBIZ this month and brought along someone to help him record the showcase. More information on these companies can be found below:

City Barrel Brewing

City Barrel Brewing is a new local KC brewery found in the Crossroad’s District. They specialize in sour, hoppy and wild beers with a twist, incorporating fruit and other adjunct flavors to differentiate their beers from their top competitors. City Barrel has a variety of foods that pair well with their craft beers from their full restaurant. Community and giving back is important to the brewery and its owners. To help give back to the community where they live and work, City Barrel partners with local charities to create a special beer where a portion of the proceeds are gifted to the charity.

Find out more about City Barrel Brewery here.

RPI Creative

RPI Creative is a marketing firm that specializes in social media platform management. They help build a personal brand for business and individuals to maximize their reach and bring a voice to their business. To do this RPI creates relatable content that people want to see and share. Likes, views, shares, and comments increases engagement and attract more potential customers or followers to the businesses social media pages. RPI Creative is not your average marketing firm, in addition to social media management, they offer a wide range of marketing services from podcasts to video creation. The more collaboration between them and the business or individual, the more authentic the content feels to the audience. Find out more about RPI Creative here.

Read about our other Entrepreneurial Showcases in our local office blogs. If you are an entrepreneur interested in sharing your story during one of our lunch-n-learns, please email Kaylee Christenson at kcevents@cbiz.com.




February 11, 2019

In our first CBIZ Executive Advantage Series of 2019, Dr. Roy Jensen and Jeff Wright from the University of Kansas Cancer Center described the impressive growth the KU Cancer Center has undergone in the last 15 years, and how they continue to change the landscape of cancer care. Here are the top four things you need to know about the KU Cancer Center and the innovative ways they are striving for a solution to a disease that affects everyone.

KU CANCER CENTER: FROM THEN TO NOW

Dr. Jensen returned to his home in Kansas City in 2004 to take the job as the Director of the KU Cancer Center. At this time, the center had been under the leadership of 18 different deans in a span of 18 years. As a result, the center was having a hard time maintaining talent and thriving as an organization. However, Dr. Jensen saw the potential within the center, and recognized that with some hard work and strategic decisions, the center had the chance to become one of the best.

With both local and regional collaborations, Dr. Jensen was able to leverage his expertise and began to build a program with the right resources and the right people. These advancements gained the KU Cancer Center the National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation in 2012. With this NCI designation, KU Cancer Center is the only center with this designation in the state of Kansas, and is one of only seventy in the United States.  This designation allows the center to have the resources to continue to innovate and also provide excellent care to Kansas Citians without having to travel far.

FUTURE OF CANCER CARE

Both Dr. Jensen and Jeff Wright are extremely excited for the future and hope to leverage the momentum KU is experiencing. Dr. Jensen stated that Dr. Joesph McGuirk is doing ground-breaking work for blood and marrow transplants. However, Dr. McGuirk is just one of over a dozen specialized doctors doing amazing work in this field. It is not just the work of these doctors; the Cancer Center itself immediately steps in to help guide patients with a cancer diagnosis. Their Nurse Navigator program enlists the help of a team of nurses whose job is to ensure that the patient is seen by the right doctor as soon as possible. This team is present throughout the patient’s diagnosis journey until a survivorship treatment plan is in place. This programming is a stepping stone for the future of patient cancer care and the holistic view of a patient’s cancer journey.

Jeff Wright also believes that immunotherapy will be the future of how we attack cancer. Both he and Dr. Jensen agree that the next five to ten years will bring dramatic changes, and that technology will continue to make a difference. KU Cancer Center will also continue to work hard in their efforts to achieve the NCI Comprehensive Cancer Center designation that is currently only given to 47 other centers in the country. This designation is a goal for the Cancer Center and would further enhance the current programs and research taking place.

WHAT EMPLOYERS SHOULD BE DOING

Simply put, Jeff said prevention. He further explained that employers can help their employees by promoting annual preventative examinations, as these exams can be the key to an early cancer diagnosis. He also believes that employers should consider coverage for screenings. Lastly, he brought up the importance of employers ensuring that there is an NCI designated hospital in their medical plan network. Statistically, patients who receive care at an NCI designated hospital have 25% better outcomes.

As individuals, there are day to day behaviors that we can engage in to lower our chances of a cancer diagnosis. Dr. Jensen mentioned engaging in a healthy lifestyle that includes healthy eating habits, maintaining an active routine, and avoiding excess consumption of alcohol and tobacco. He said that thirty-one percent of cancer cases are linked to tobacco. Finally, he emphasized that everyone should be getting vaccinated, specifically for HPV – over 40,000 cases of cancer could be prevented every year if everyone received this vaccination.

HOW KANSAS CITIANS CAN HELP

Both Dr. Jensen and Jeff Wright feel that any organization that helps fight back against cancer is a worthy cause. Additionally, they both are passionate about spreading the news of the KU Cancer Center and informing the public of their comprehensive cancer care. Both are determined and dedicated to bring the entire spectrum of care to Kansas City to optimize and enhance patient outcomes. As mentioned, there are many opportunities to get involved in within the KU Cancer Center, click here to learn how to get involved today!

See below for an afterword from Dr Jensen -

“It was an honor to talk with you all about The University of Kansas Cancer Center – to share our story and vision for the future.  As you can tell, this is an exciting time for us and we are dedicated to providing the most innovative cancer research and treatment for patients in the region.  As you heard, we are embarking on a quest to achieve NCI Comprehensive designation.  This effort will require a great deal of community support.  If you are interested in learning more about how you can participate personally, please feel free to reach out to Krista Allen, Director of Development, at kallen@kuendowment.org. Thank you again for spending your time with us at the Executive Advantage Series.”

To register for the next CBIZ Executive Advantage Series event in April, please email kcevents@CBIZ.com for more information.




February 4, 2019

There were quite a few small start-ups that came through our office this windy and chilly January. Some of which were Idle Smart and Venture360. More information on each of these companies can be found below:

 

Idle Smart

Idle Smart is the ideal technology for trucks and soon to be other vehicles. They insert a wireless mechanism into the vehicle’s engine that can automatically turn on or off the idle vehicles once they reach their customized temperature or battery level. Idle Smart has been able to help reduce carbon-dioxide emissions and was recognized as a recommended product by the EPA. This technology is saving firms thousands of dollars year after year. Within the next year, they plan on expanding to ambulances and school busses. Find out more about Idle Smart here.

 

Venture360

Venture360 is a software that helps manage major investments for private firms. The software creates a digital representation of company’s financial transactions for investors and owners to see easily. They help to connect investors with start-ups on a user-friendly and access controlled platform. Within the next year they hope to release Liquifi. The next instalment of investment management that allows individuals to trade their stocks in private firms. Find out more about Venture360 here.

 

Check out our other Entrepreneurial Showcases in our local office blogs. If you are an entrepreneur interested in sharing your story during one of our lunch-n-learns, please email Kaylee Christenson at kcevents@cbiz.com.

 




January 29, 2019

January 2019 | Michelle Kruse continues to do amazing work with our client, Center School District. See below or click here to check out the District's featured PBS segment about their innovative programming!